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Submissions

Eye to the Telescope 31, Crossroads, will be edited by Heather Moser.

Demons, devils, goddesses, life changes, and journeys. All of these things come to mind when discussing crossroads in the fantasy realm. Crossroads are involved in some of the most intriguing stories of character evolution, often symbolizing a massive shift in the very core of an individual. They appear in legends ranging from Robert Johnson selling his soul to the devil at a Mississippi crossroads in exchange for unrivaled guitar abilities to classical myths discussing the goddess Hekate, a guardian of the crossroads, as she aids those who traverse the realms of life and death. In each scenario, significant changes follow as a direct result of the path chosen while visiting the crossroads.

I am looking for poems that pay homage to the supernatural nature of the crossroads: poems that embody the heaviness and darkness that seem to emanate from the crossroads of fantasy. Writers are asked to submit poetic creations that express the seriousness of the life-altering moment when standing in the liminal space between one decision and the next. Who or what guides an individual during this decision? Where do the crossroads lead, or is the main event at the center where all roads intersect? What brought your character to the crossroads in the first place? What transformation was brought about due to the visit at the crossroads?  It is up to you, as the poet, to decide which journey to take for your submission, and I am thrilled to see what beauty is created from this prompt! 

Submission Guidelines

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

  • Please submit 1–3 poems in English (in body of e-mail, or attached as .doc, .docx, or .rtf).
  • Please send submissions to ettt31@sfpoetry.com with the subject line “ETTT sub:” followed by the poet’s name.
  • Include a short bio.
  • Deadline: December 15. The issue will appear on January 15, 2019.

Payment and rights

  • Accepted poems will be paid for at the following rate: US 3¢/word rounded to nearest dollar; minimum US $3, maximum $25. Payment is on publication.
  • The Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association normally uses PayPal to pay poets, but can also send checks.
  • Eye to the Telescope is an online publication. Therefore, First Electronic Rights (for original unpublished poems) are being sought.

Who can submit?

Anyone writing speculative poetry.


What is Speculative Poetry?

Speculative poetry is poetry which falls within the genres of science fiction, fantasy, and supernatural horror, plus some related genres such as magic realism, metafiction, and fabulation. It is not easy to give precise definitions, partly because many of these genres are framed in term of fiction rather than poetry.

A good starting point is “About Science Fiction Poetry” by Suzette Haden Elgin, the founder of the Science Fiction Poetry Association. Despite its title, this article is applicable all forms of speculative poetry.

Tim Jones, editor of Issue 2, had a go at defining science fiction poetry on his blog, in two parts (These blog posts date from 2009, and the Voyagers anthology has since been published. These posts do refer specifically to science fiction poetry, rather than the broader field of speculative poetry.):

timjonesbooks.blogspot.com/2009/02/what-is-science-fiction-poetry-part-1.html

timjonesbooks.blogspot.com/2009/02/what-is-science-fiction-poetry-part-2.html


What Is the Science Fiction & Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA)?

As the SFPA says on its website at sfpoetry.com, “The Science Fiction Poetry Association was founded in 1978 to bring together poets and readers interested in science fiction poetry. What is sf poetry? You know what they say about definitions—everybody has one. To be sure, it is poetry (we’ll leave that definition to you), but it’s poetry with some element of speculation—usually science fiction, fantasy, or horror. Some folks include surrealism, some straight science.”

See the SFPA site for lots more information—and please consider joining.

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Interested in editing an issue of Eye to the Telescope? See the Editors’ Guidelines for information and requirements.